Logo of the Royal Monastery of San Jeronimo of Granada

Book your tickets to the Monastery of San Jeronimo

Tickets for the Monastery of San Jeronimo of Granada and cultural visits can be purchased throughout the year, except during hours of worship and other religious celebrations. Visitors are advised of the possibility of unforeseen and unannounced schedule changes. Please confirm schedules prior to the visit.
Buy tickets online for the Monastery of San Jeronimo in Granada Buy tickets
Comprar entradas online para visitar el Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada
Comprar entradas online para visitar el Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada
Comprar entradas online para visitar el Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada
Comprar entradas online para visitar el Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada
Comprar entradas online para visitar el Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada
Schedule

  • Monday to Sunday from 10:00-13:00/15:00-18:00 h. winter schedule (CLOSING DOORS 13:30 and 18:30 h.)
  • Monday to Sunday from 10:00-13:00/16:00-19:30 h. summer schedule (CLOSING DOORS 13:30 and 20:00 h.)

Prices
  • - Individual: 5€
  • - Children: 0€
  • - Students / Other capacities less than 65%: 3.5€
Visit rules

  • It is permitted to take photographs and video inside the Monastery of St. Jerome as long as it does not disturb those people who are in prayer.
  • During the liturgical acts, sightseeing inside the temple is not allowed.
  • It is forbidden to drink beverages and consume food inside.
  • It is necessary to keep silence and dress with decorum inside the temple.
  • Please turn off your cell phone out of respect for those who are in prayer.
  • Discover your head when entering the temple.
  • Smoking is not allowed on the premises.
  • It is not allowed to enter the Monastery of San Jeronimo with pets except guide dogs.
  • Minors must be properly accompanied by adults, do not allow them to run around the Temple.
Buy tickets online for the Monastery of San Jeronimo in Granada
Buy tickets online for the Monastery of San Jeronimo in Granada
About Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Granada

The Monastery of San Jeronimo was founded by the Catholic Monarchs in 1492 in the camp they had established in the nearby town of Santa Fe. However, when the monks realized that the chosen site was not the most suitable, it was soon moved to Granada and in 1503 construction began in its current location, taking then the name it has now: Real Monasterio de la Concepción de Nuestra Señora de Granada.

The Hieronymite monks began to live in the monastery in 1521 and remained there until the disentailment of Mendizábal (1835), when it was used as a barracks. However, in the sixties of the twentieth century, it was again ceded to the Order of St. Jerome and, after a process of restoration and recovery, returned to its original function, being now occupied by the community of Hieronymite mothers who, from the nearby Monastery of Santa Paula, now converted into a hotel, moved to St. Jerome in 1977.

The tourist visit to the Monastery offers the possibility of visiting the Compass, the Processional Cloister, the refectory, the profundis room, two chapter rooms, the sacristy and the Church.

In the Compass, which serves as a transition between the bustle of the city and the silence of the Monastery, we can appreciate, among other things, the superb facade of the church due to Diego de Siloé, Martín Díaz de Navarrete and Pedro de Orea.

The Processional or Main Cloister, in Gothic style, was the area where the monks developed most of their life in the monastery. From this cloister we will be able to see, although not access because it is a cloistered area where the Hieronymite Mothers live, the so-called Empress Cloister. This name refers to the circumstance of having been in this place where, in 1526, Isabel of Portugal, the wife of Charles I of Spain and V of Germany, resided for most of the time she was in Granada.

In the sacristy is the Child Jesus of the Battles, the image that accompanied the Great Captain in his multiple and victorious war enterprises.

From the Processional Cloister you can access the impressive Church of the Monastery dedicated to the Immaculate Conception. Among many other works of art, we can admire its Main Chapel, built in Renaissance style by Doña María de Manrique, Duchess of Sessa, to serve as the pantheon of her husband, the Great Captain. It was built by Diego de Siloé following the lines previously proposed by Jacobo Florentino. We can also admire the beautiful Mannerist altarpiece in which important artists such as Juan de Aragón, Lázaro de Velasco, Pedro de Orea, Pedro de Raxis, Bernabé de Gaviria, Vázquez el Mozo and Rojas, among others, worked.

Author of the text: Joaquín Martínez